#Celerity: A Critique of the Manifesto for an Accelerationist Politics

Post-Work

McKenzie Wark (A Hacker Manifesto, and The Beach Beneath the Street) has been kind enough to send us his detailed response to the “#Accelerate” piece which has been circulating around the internet. Since the aim of that original piece was, in part, to polemically intervene in a number of contemporary debates in the UK and US left, it’s been encouraging to see both critical and supportive responses to the vision it set out. Wark’s response here forms a significant and comprehensive commentary on that vision.

It should be emphasised though that “#Accelerate” was written in manifesto form, which means it was presented with the rhetorical force of declarative certainty. Yet while we are confident in the broad strokes of this approach, the specifics are open to debate and we’ve only begun to think through the issues involved. The idea of the manifesto was, first, to initiate and generate conversations about the longest term viewpoint on left politics at a profound moment of crisis. It was meant as a provocation that would raise questions, broach some neglected topics, and put certain key themes on the table. The manifesto was, second, intended to put forth what we believe to be a unique set of possible answers – ones that will hopefully generate further research. Yet, we are not trying to create a new doctrine, nor to determine in advance what must be an experimental process involving the creativity of mass politics. The emphasis, both here and in the manifesto, is on experimentation beyond traditional leftist tactics, in order to discover what works in practice.

Wark’s response is available here. And you can find the original manifesto here. More texts are available at Synthetic Edifice.

Translation of Laruelle’s “Who Are Minorities and How To Think Them”

In honor of the recent translations of Laruelle’s work (Struggle and Utopia, Principles, Anti-Badiou), as well as a couple coming out in May (Dictionary, Philosophy and Non-Philosophy), I have decided to post my translation of an essay of Laruelle’s from the 80s on ‘politics’. The journal in which Laruelle originally published the essay is now defunct. If anyone desires the original French text, please let me know. It should also be noted that at the end of the essay there is an extensive bibliography on the subject-matter of minorities, but I am unaware whether or not this is Laruelle’s or is provided by the journal…I am under the assumption that these references are provided as further reading by the journal, insofar as they concern geopolitical/juridical discourses on minorities (no philosophy, strictly speaking, is included). The publications referenced there are in English and French.

F. Laruelle. “Qui sont les Minorités et comment les penser”. Etudes polémologiques 43 (1987): 175-89.

Who Are Minorities and How To Think Them?

            Minorities represent a certain type of problem both insistent or inevitable and never resolved. For political science, one might say that it is a crux, a theoretical impasse. The same goes for political practice. What is behind this difficulty? There are several reasons. First, for a political reason, it became a problem or a question. The problem of Minorities emerged as such with the history of the great modern States with which it is coextensive and whose constitution it accompanies. Perhaps it was a less critical or less obvious problem with the grand Empires where Minorities were recognized and sometimes repressed de facto. But in the 19th century with the establishment of the unified and more or less centralized States, they have become a question as such for political theory, which is simultaneously the sign of their problematic character and the beginning of their recognition as such.

Afterwards, it was not simply a political problem, but became social. I believe that it is important for reflection and theory and completely necessary for philosophy to overcome the political limitation of the concept of “Minorities” to which it is too often restrained. The problem has developed an incredible extension with the appearance of Minorities of a totally different type than the national and political. No doubt they are born as political and historical problems, but they now undergo new experiences and require more extensive and not simply political definitions.

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Symposium: Schelling and Naturphilosophie

Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Duquesne University

Dept. of Philosophy

Pittsburgh, PA

Call for Applications

 We are pleased to announce the Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy, held at Duquesne University.  Details for the program are as follows:

Schelling and Naturphilosophie

August 5 – 9, 2013

(Optional Participants’ Conference, August 3-4)

“What then is that secret bond which couples our mind to Nature, or that hidden organ through which Nature speaks to our mind or our mind to Nature?” (Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature)

“The concept of nature does not entail that there should also be an intelligence that is aware of it. Nature, it seems, would exist, even if there were nothing that was aware of it. Hence the problem can also be formulated thus: how does intelligence come to be added to nature, or how does nature come to be presented?” (System of Transcendental Idealism)

Seminar Leaders:

Prof. Iain Hamilton Grant (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Prof. Jason Wirth (Seattle University)

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Notes to Laruelle’s ‘Introduction to the Generic Sciences’

[F. Laruelle. Introduction aux sciences géneriques: Editions Petra, Paris, 2008]. These are notes hastily typed up. I have tried to stay close to Laruelle’s verbiage while keeping them notes. I have also interpolated as little as possible.

Introduction

This work calls “generic” a type of sciences or knowledges [connaissances] sufficiently neutral and devoid of particularity in order to be added to others more determined and co-operate with them, transforming them without destroying them or denying their scientific nature. They are capable of being added to others acquired in a more “classical” way without unsettling what the latter take from their domain of object and legality, i.e. capable of transforming knowledge without philosophically destroying it.

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Weaponising Speculation Conference & Exhibition (Dublin, March 2-7 2013)

DUST (Dublin Unit for Speculative Thought) presents:

Weaponising Speculation Conference

2-3 March, Independent Colleges, 60-63 Dawson Street, Dublin 2.

This gathering is the signature event organized by D.U.S.T (Dublin Unit for Speculative Thought), an art/theory collective recently founded by Michael O’Rourke, Paul Ennis and Fintan Neylan. The primary aim of DUST is to stage conversations between disparate groups of people—artists, aestheticians, philosophers, non-philosophers, theorists—who find themselves at the fringes of academic institutions and disciplines and who are also broadly interested in speculative realism and post-continental philosophy.

WS CONFERENCE POSTER FINAL

“Weaponizing Speculations” is a non-traditional assembly which has as its impetus the opening up of a dialogue between artists, para-academics and the Speculative Realist “community” here in Dublin and elsewhere. Here is the description:

“Distinct from the norm. Distinct even from the academic norm. Twice removed the para-academic is doubly unwanted. The ones you have trained are set loose and they know your secrets. They are pests and they want to be armed. The contemporary para-academic is untethered. Promises have gone unfulfilled and yet avenues have opened up elsewhere. To the artists, to the creators, to the fringe, wherever the real can be captured. It is in these topoi that the real work happens.

Speculation: to think the world of experience, beyond such experience. But how to seize this reality, how to speculate upon that which the academy has prohibited? Before the storms the para-academic needs to equip herself. Not only with tools, but weapons.

‘Weaponizing Speculation’ is an exploration of the various expressions of DIY theory operative in the elsewheres,the shafts and tunnels of the para-academy. We seek those thoughts that go beyond the institution, beyond the linguistic, beyond the human, to the far reaches of the incommensurate and the extinct; we seek conceptual armoury which will aid thinkers in the siege to reclaim the real.

We invite papers from those lost at sea”.

Those lost at sea are:

Saturday 2 March

Independent Colleges, Room 101

10.00-10.15 Introductory remarks: Paul Ennis, Fintan Neylan, Michael O’Rourke

10.15-11.00 Session 1: Robert Jackson, Rebecca O’Dwyer

11.00-11.15 Break

11.15-12.15 Session 2: Nick Srnicek, Dylan Trigg

12.15-13.00 Session 3: Erin Stapleton, Alice Rekab

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00-14.45 Session 4: Francis Halsall, Alan Boardman

14.45-15.30 Session 5: Isabel Nolan, Sergey Sistiaga

15.30-15.45 Break

16.00-16.45 Session 6: MOUTH (Edia Connole, Scott Wilson) with Pat Zaidan, Mairtin Mac Con Iomaire, Kathy Tynan

20.00-22.00 Opening of Weaponising Speculation Exhibition, BLOCK T Gallery, Smithfield, Dublin 7

Sunday 3 March

Independent Colleges, Room 101

10.00-10.45 Session 7: Ridvan Askin, Ciara McMahon

10.45-11.30 Session 8: John Ryan, Ciara Griffin

11.30-12.30 Lunch

12.30-13.15 Session 9: Rob Murphy, Andy Weir

13.15-14.00 Session 10: Dock Currie, Sam Keogh

14.00-14.15 Break

14.15-15.15 Session 11: Teresa Gillespie, Ben Woodard

15.15-16.00 Session 12: Karen Dewart McEwen, Scott Wilson

16.00-16.15 Closing remarks: Paul Ennis, Fintan Neylan, Michael O’Rourke

18.00-20.00 Weaponising Speculation Exhibition, BLOCK T Gallery, Smithfield, Dublin 7

WS EXHIBITION POSTER FINAL

D.U.S.T (Dublin Unit for Speculative Thought) presents:

Weaponising Speculation Exhibition

VENUE: BLOCKT, Smithfield Chambers, Smithfield Square, Dublin 7

OPENING: Saturday 2 March

TIME: 8 pm-10pm

COST: Free

Weaponising Speculation continues March 3 (6-8pm); March 4-March 6 (11am-6pm) and March 7 (11am-8pm)

http://www.blockt.ie

http://dublindust.wordpress.com/

Exhibiting Artists:

Alan Boardman

Teresa Gillespie

Ciara McMahon

Rob Murphy

Alice Rekab

John Ryan

Andy Weir

Speculation: to think the world of experience, beyond such experience. But how to seize this reality, how to speculate upon that which the academy and the art world has prohibited? Before the storm the para-academic and the artist need to equip themselves. Not only with tools, but weapons. Weaponizing Speculation is an exploration of the various expressions of art and theory operative in the elsewheres, the shafts and tunnels of the para-academy; an expedition armoured with techniques of thought that go beyond the institution, beyond the linguistic, beyond the human, to the far reaches of the incommensurate and the extinct; it builds a conceptual arsenal which will aid thinkers in the siege to reclaim the real.

The Weaponising Speculation exhibition is an accompaniment to the conference of the same name organized by D.U.S.T (Dublin Unit for Speculative Thought), an art/theory collective recently founded by Michael O’Rourke, Paul Ennis and Fintan Neylan. The primary aim of DUST is to stage dialogues between disparate groups of people—artists, aestheticians, philosophers, non-philosophers, theorists—who find themselves at the fringes of academic institutions and disciplines and who are also broadly concerned with speculative realism. “Weaponising Speculation” features paintings, sculptures, video and sound works by seven artists who are also speaking at the conference which will take place at Independent Colleges on March 2nd and 3rd. The show is a loose collocation of works which cluster around a shared set of interests including speculative realism, object oriented ontology, post-continental philosophy, new materialisms, systems theory, transcendental nihilism, and para-academic practices.

The exhibition will conclude with a conversation amongst the artists about how the exhibition as a “coreless experiment” isonomic with the Weaponising Speculation conference has succeeded or failed and will also consider the future trajectories of speculative thought and art/theory.

CFP – MACRO, Rome, April, 2013

Call for Papers – MACRO, Rome, April, 2013

Call for Papers
Joan of Art Towards a Free Education
Conference April 13th 2013
MACRO, Via Nizza, Rome, Italy

In collaboration with Nomas Foundation, European Alternatives

Hypothesis: Freedom in an unfree society can only be feigned. Such a feigning is by definition an artistic act. In a post-political age art bears a social responsibility.

The aim of the project ‘Joan of Art: Towards a Free Education System’ is to deliver a free education system, starting from the very basis of what education is: The sharing of information. In the first stages the very notion of education will be explored so that a new system can be delivered which recognises the value of knowledge sharing between peers and across disciplines. Finally a free accredited system will be set up in such a way that it can be delivered from anywhere in the world, growing and changing organically as it disperses via accessible communication platforms. In this way it is intended to break the monopoly that the State-Business model has over education.

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