CFP: Affirmation, Negation and the Politics of Late-Capitalism

The apocalyptic tenor surrounding recent financial crises has both explicitly and implicitly drudged up the undying leftist dream of a post-capitalist society. While Zizek has rightly noted that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism, both his politics of refusal as well as Badiou’s politics of affirmation and varying configurations of post-modernist politics of the Other have left something to be desired in terms of anti-capitalist debate. Furthermore, the anti-humanist philosophical project of speculative realism, while noetically incisive, has had oddly little to say about anti-capitalist struggle–or any political struggle for that matter.

Papers are sought which investigate the varying degrees to which the thinking against or without the human (humanism/agency, etc.) is a viable political project in the age of Late Capitalism. How can a hyper-negative or darkly vitalist politics work within a capitalist frame without merely sinking into the common apathy of broadly marketable attitudes? Can capitalist life be truly haunted in a way which is politically generative? Can the speculative realist grasp of the object illuminate the machinations of capital?

Topics could include:

Agency and Capitalism

Hauntology and Capitalism

Xenoeconomics as a Politics

Nihilism and Capital

Crisis and the Structure of Capitalism

Speculative Realist Politics and Capitalism

Abstracts of 250-300 words should be submitted by November 30th.
Final papers of 2000-3000 words should be submitted by January 1st.
Discussion (virtual or actual) will commence on January 31st.

Please send correspondence to speculativeheresy [at] gmail [dot] com

Cross Post at will.

Call for Debate/Call for Papers – Speculative Realist Politics and Xenoeconomics

Given the posts at Splintering Bone Ashes (1, 2, 3) K-Punk’s responses (1. 2) as well as No Useless Leniency’s Comments (1, 2), Planomenology’s Comments (1) and connections here and here – It seems sensible to dedicate a space to these debates which center on capital, nihilism, utopia, hauntology and the neologisms of xenoeconomics and accelerationism.

To throw in my own two cents: it would seem that, on the most fundamental level, that the issue is the relation of structure and novelty – of Badiou’s early push of destruction and his later championing of subtraction – of nihil as clearing the field or as radical refusal or as…?

The plasticity of capitalist structures, humanism and the status of remainders and exceptions (haunts, agency) have also been called into question – the doom saying surrounding the Hadron Collider luckily slid right into the economic chaos.  This is also a prime avenue for discussing Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia – in particular petropolitics and sun economies – capitalism as a “planetary inevitability” and that it is an entity existing prior to the human merely waiting for a host (p. 27).

As a point of comparison – my own clumsy forays into a possible Speculative Realist politics are here and here but they centered on ecological issues and only briefly touched on the economic.

[Update #1:]

Planomenology – Notes for the Debate: Alien vs. Specter

Eliminative Culinarism – Hauntology, or a Shady Vitalism

K-Punk – Spectres of Accelerationism

Schoolboy Errors – Theory and Accelerationism/Xenoeconomics

Poetix – Capital Rules Everything Around Me

Poetix – Unlived Life

Schoolboy Errors – Theory and Accelerationism/Xenoeconomics II

No Useless Leniency – Capital and Agency (Encore)

Splintering Bone Ashes – Some Aims Regarding Speculative Realism and Politics

Splintering Bone Ashes – We are the Dead: Disconnected Thoughts on Spectrospheric Agency

[Update #2:]

While it is impossible to know the shelf life of any particular brand of academic excitement – I think that there is too much in the ongoing debates to let slide.  I think a virtual CFP for a virtual (or material?) conference might be warranted.  The broad theme would be Capitalism without Humans asking for works engaging:

Agency and Capitalism

Hauntology and Capitalism

Xenoeconomics as a Politics

Nihilism and Capital

Crisis and the Structure of Capitalism

Speculative Realist Politics

Papers would be sought which investigate the varying degrees to which the thinking against or without the human (humanism/agency etc) is a viable political project in the age of Late Capitalism.  How can a hyper-negative or darkly vitalist politics work within a capitalist frame without merely sinking into the common apathy of broadly marketable attitudes?  Can capitalist life be truly haunted in a way which is politically generative?

Suggestions of a timetable would be appreciated.

Chapter 3 of Laruelle’s Introduction to Non-Marxism: Determination-in-the-Last-Instance (DLI)

Laruelle, Francois. Introduction au non-marxism. PUF: Paris, 2000. 39-55.

Chapter III: Determination-in-the-Last-Instance

First Elucidation of the Determination-in-the-Last-Instance (DLI)

The determination-in-the-last-instance, invented by Marx-Engels for historical Materialism, never received from them a concept adequate enough to simultaneously produce all the theoretical and critical effects within its capacity. It has been understood in a far too empirical manner, applied on models of ontico-regional, physical and chemical causality (theory of gases, composition of forces) completely inadequate for the foundation of a new science of history and society, let alone the thought-world. It has thus been fashionable to dialectize and re-philosophize it, to fold it with what should justifiably replace and suspend it, the dialectic as essence of philosophy under its most theoretical and idealist form across its materialist reversal apparently more capable of giving it its fecundity (confusion of the Real of immanence with matter). Marx’s great discovery—uni-lateral causality against all philosophical phantasms of reciprocity and convertibility—has remained fallow without having been exploited in its non-philosophical power (puissance), more heretical than philosophically “revolutionary.” So as to elucidate it in our style, i.e. make its Marxist forms appear as simple symptoms and models of a more radical concept of causality, the method follows three periods, the third being the most important for our purposes. The first reassembles its Marxist statements and usages—these are known. The second consists in “listening to” the first immediate, quasi-phenomenological suggestions which contain the same formula of “DLI” and in treating them as a prioris which give the DLI and which must be transformed. The third, which we will particularly develop, endeavors to “ground” in a real-transcendental way, i.e. here and better still, to determine these a priori traits as belonging to the same Real or to the immanent infrastructure as its innermost causality (causalité la plus propre).
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